Former Annapolis Police Officer Indicted for DUI and Manslaughter

A 52-year-old former Annapolis police officer is facing charges for drunk driving and manslaughter. The charges come from alleged his involvement in a crash that killed a 19-year-old man. The officer also faces charges of speeding and running a red light. He resigned from the Annapolis Police Department on August 1, 2011.

According to The Baltimore Sun, the accident occurred on October 3, 2010, at the intersection of Patapsco Avenue and Potee Street. The off-duty officer was driving his personal vehicle at the time. The crash caused the driver to eject the vehicle and later causing death as a result of his injuries.

Manslaughter refers to the killing of a human being, but the charge differs from a homicide based on intent. Someone charged with manslaughter did not necessarily intend to kill the victim or create a deadly situation, while someone who committed homicide generally intended to kill or knew that his or her actions would result in the death of the victim. A Maryland manslaughter conviction carries a maximum prison term of 10 years.

Facing Manslaughter Charges?

Because manslaughter is such a serious charge, hiring an experienced Maryland criminal defense lawyer is one of the best things you can do to protect your rights. Law enforcement officers sometimes make mistakes that could change the outcome of your case. An experienced attorney can review police reports, witness statements, accident reports and other documents to determine the best way to defend you against this charge.

If you are facing a manslaughter charge in Maryland, contact the Maryland criminal defense attorneys at Alpert Schreyer. Call us at 1-866-444-6363 or 301-262-7005 for a no-obligation evaluation of your case.

About Andrew Alpert

+Andrew is one of the leading DUI and criminal defense attorneys in both the state of Maryland and the District of Columbia. He blogs about Maryland DUI law, has numerous videos on the subject and has been asked to appear on national television to offer his legal opinion on high-profile criminal cases.