Maryland Citizens May Be Able to Recall Officials Convicted of Crimes

A Maryland state delegate will soon introduce legislation that would allow Maryland citizens to recall elected officials if they are charged with a crime, according to BallotNews.org.

Under current law, only the governor can remove elected officials at the state level who have been convicted of a crime or have pleaded guilty to a crime. A council can remove elected officials at the county level only if a physical or mental disability prevents them from performing the duties of their office.

Details about the bill have not yet been released. The delegate proposing the legislation must decide how recall elections would be administered before drafting the legislation.

In our society, anyone who has been convicted of or pleaded guilty to a crime can be punished far beyond the criminal penalties. If this legislation passes, an elected official convicted of a minor crime having nothing to do with the duties of office could potentially be kicked out of office or receive a significant amount of societal scorn. In addition to the dangers of losing a career, a person who has been found guilty of a crime could serve jail time, pay serious fines, lose their driver’s license, and endure other harsh consequences.

Because the penalties associated with a criminal conviction in Maryland are so severe, if you are facing criminal charges, you should seek the advice of a criminal defense attorney with the knowledge and experience to provide you with an aggressive defense. At Alpert Schreyer, LLC, our Maryland criminal defense attorneys can build a strong case on your behalf so that you can get your life back on track. Contact us today at 866-444-6363 for a free consultation about your case.

About Andrew Alpert

+Andrew is one of the leading DUI and criminal defense attorneys in both the state of Maryland and the District of Columbia. He blogs about Maryland DUI law, has numerous videos on the subject and has been asked to appear on national television to offer his legal opinion on high-profile criminal cases.