Report Shows that Police Taser Use Does Not Follow Standards

Two years ago a man died after a police officer shot him twice with a taser outside of his home in Frederick, Maryland. Although a grand jury ruled that the officer was justified in his actions, Maryland’s Attorney General was prompted to begin a comprehensive review of police use of tasers. The breakthrough findings were recently released.

The report indicated that police officers have an over-reliance on the weapon, despite the fact that they are told in training to treat tasers as if they were guns or other deadly weapons. The report also showed that not all officers should use tasers and that the weapon should not be used against unarmed people fleeing or destroying evidence as the device can cause death or serious injury in certain circumstances.

According to the report, Montgomery County has the highest police taser use of 222 times a year followed by Baltimore City and County. Currently, no police agency in Maryland meets the standards outlined in the report. If used appropriately, tasers can save lives and can be a valuable tool for law enforcement to protect themselves and the community. However, tougher laws and regulations are due, especially for private citizens who legally own tasers.

If you have been accused of a crime and a police officer had unnecessarily used a taser or other weapon against you, there are steps you can take to protect your rights and possibly have charges against you dismissed or significantly reduced. Contact the experienced Maryland criminal defense lawyers at Alpert Schreyer at 866-444-6363 for a free and confidential evaluation of your case today.

Source report: http://wjz.com/local/taser.tasered.2.1375959.html

About Andrew Alpert

+Andrew is one of the leading DUI and criminal defense attorneys in both the state of Maryland and the District of Columbia. He blogs about Maryland DUI law, has numerous videos on the subject and has been asked to appear on national television to offer his legal opinion on high-profile criminal cases.