51-Month Prison Sentence for Armed Bank Robber in Maryland

CBS Baltimore reports that a St. Michaels resident convicted of armed bank robbery received a 51-month prison sentence this week. The suspect entered the Talbot Bank of Tilghman, located on Tilghman Island, in March of last year with a .22 caliber rifle. He demanded money from a teller and walked out with more than $4,700; however, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) stated that the suspect was identified very quickly by the truck he was driving when he left the bank and was arrested that night. The money stolen was recovered by authorities.

Robbery with an armed weapon is considered a felony theft crime in Maryland and it is treated very seriously by the state. Robbery is defined as the obtaining of property from another person by force or through the threat of force. The “property” could be money or valuables, and the “force” could be actual physical contact or simply threatening a person. The state penalty for robbery (without a weapon) is a maximum 15-year prison sentence, and an armed robbery conviction carries with it a maximum jail sentence of 20 years. Anyone convicted of the similar crime of armed carjacking may receive up to 30 years behind bars.

Being convicted of robbery charges can have a very negative impact on a person’s future, and the penalties one may face can be severe. As the state takes this crime very seriously, hiring a knowledgeable Bethesda theft defense lawyer would be well advised as the state will do everything possible to punish you with the maximum penalty. At Alpert Schreyer, we have years of experience defending those facing robbery charges and we will help build a defense to protect your legal rights throughout your case. For a no-cost consultation, please call (866) 444-6363.

About Andrew Alpert

+Andrew is one of the leading DUI and criminal defense attorneys in both the state of Maryland and the District of Columbia. He blogs about Maryland DUI law, has numerous videos on the subject and has been asked to appear on national television to offer his legal opinion on high-profile criminal cases.